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Theological Notebook: John W. O'Malley, SJ on Vatican II historiography

All I have time to say, as I'm editing my paper for Notre Dame before leaving for South Bend tomorrow is that this was brilliant. Allow me to copy from an equally-inadequate letter to Dan Lloyd and from the Marquette press release:
Well, even though I couldn't afford the time, I went anyway, and it was fabulous. O'Malley's clarity and reserve in dealing with the texts of Vatican II--in response to the new counter-historiography of the Council recently launched, if you've watched any of that--was a model of modesty and integrity. I hope the article hits a popular press outlet because this is just the type of accessible argument and treatment that people profit by. Dan, I wish I'd leaned on you to come: I think you would have thanked me for it.

I even got to meet O'Malley briefly as it turned out to be him I was climbing over to get a seat, down by Markus, Rossi, and Schmidt. I was able to say that I was sorry we couldn't really talk, but that I thought The First Jesuits to be great fun. The place was packed. I don't think I've ever seen a crowd that large for a Theology event before. I wish the Pere Marquette Lectures looked like that.


Vatican II: Did Anything Happen?

Rev. John W. O'Malley
Weston Jesuit School of Theology

Date: September 28, 2005
Location: Marquette University Weasler Auditorium
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Cost: Free and open to the public

John W. O’Malley, S.J., Distinguished Professor of Church History at the Weston Jesuit School of Theology in Cambridge, MA, is an internationally recognized scholar and lecturer. He has written extensively on various aspects of the religious culture of Catholicism including Vatican II. Among his many books the best known and most acclaimed is The First Jesuits (Harvard University Press, 1993), translated into seven languages. He holds a doctorate in history from Harvard, and has received a number of prestigious awards and fellowships, including a Guggenheim, the Rome Prize of the American Academy in Rome, and the Paul Oskar Kirsteller Lifetime Achievement Award from the Renaissance Society of America. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and holds thirteen honorary doctorates, including one from Marquette University awarded in 2004.
I cannot help but second the approval of The First Jesuits if you're ever looking for some good historical reading--it's a real pleasure. I note with dismay that I'm missing these über-cool "science and religion" events tomorrow--damn, this place is happening! :
“The Emergence of Complexity and the Limits of Physics,” presentation by Dr. George F.R. Ellis, distinguished professor emeritus of mathematics and applied mathematics, University of Cape Town, South Africa, and 2004 winner of the Templeton Prize, which recognizes distinguished contributions toward advancing the worldwide dialogue between science and religion. As a cosmologist, Ellis is renowned for his scientific contributions toward understanding the origin and nature of the cosmos. In the 1970s, he was a forceful opponent of apartheid in South Africa. Wehr Physics, 216, 2 p.m. Refreshments served at 1:45 p.m.

“Science and Religion in Dialogue,” second Rigge Lecture on Physics and Society by Dr. George F.R. Ellis, distinguished professor emeritus of mathematics and applied mathematics, University of Cape Town, South Africa, and 2004 winner of the Templeton Prize, which recognizes distinguished contributions toward advancing the worldwide dialogue between science and religion. As a cosmologist, Ellis is renowned for his scientific contributions toward understanding the origin and nature of the cosmos. In the 1970s, he was a forceful opponent of apartheid in South Africa. Varsity Theatre, 5:30 p.m. Refreshments served at 5 p.m.
Tags: books, ecclesiology, education, hierarchy, historical, historiography, jesuits, marquette, political, scientific, second vatican council, theological notebook, vatican
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